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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
is more of what we've heard from the judicial inquiry and a new relationship, certainly in britain between the press and politicians whereby meetings will still go on, but now everything will be open, above board and logged every time. which i think is a reform very much overdue. >> do you have suspicions about the prime minister david cameron that he may have known more than he's acknowledging? >> none whatsoever. and even among the most rabid labor parties i haven't heard anything about the prime minister's integrity. people talk about the judgment in hiring andy coulson, but hiebd sight is absolutely perfe perfect. and many in the press at the time thought it was an inspired appointment. also, mr. coulson's guilt hasn't been proven so far either. so no, the prime minister his integrity isn't called into any kind of question. when he announced a very strong statement tomorrow and his mps backing him. indeed we've had polling in this country showing the conservatives taking a lead over the labor party. so this isn't stirring the public. >> you were asking the questions when that intruder
or hong kong or germany or britain or indeed canada, and believe when this historical episode is written, michael, they will lay the blame squarely on the part of the republicans and personally on john banenoehner particularly. we've known for ten years of the public, trade deficit. we looking at a bipartisan approach on that. you've had various commissions in that regard. what republicans decide to do, up the ante, accelerate things and have the fight now. what in effect did they do? use the debt ceiling. that means they're saying to the rest of the world, you know thathat $14 trillion? we may not pay the principle and hold the rest of the world ransom subpoena what did they get in return noor? remember here from s&p, $4 trillion of spending consults or revenue to bend the kurn down. when obama was talking to boehner a few weeks ago, we getting near that. now we don't have anywhere near a $4 trillion move at all. because bavor couldn't sell the revenue increases to the party. last we're holding the world to ransom. one more thing, michael. in that process, the politics are now poisoned.
. it is the gown that katherine wore when she married britain's prince william. the ivory and white is a in the dress is the centerpiece at buckingham palaces annual summer opening. the gone stands on a special platform topped off with a tiara the queen loaned katherine for that wedding. >>> wolf blitzer joins us in such a few minutes. first breaking news. we want to get you caught up right now. >>> survivor describing how he avoided the gunman that shot up a youth camp in norway. 85 people died following a bombing in the capital of oslo which claimed seven lives. police have suspect in custody. michael, what's happening now? >> reporter: yeah. i can tell you, we've just heard on local media here that the lawyer for the suspect in this case, his name is anders behring breivik, the lawyer is telling the local television here that the shooting suspect believed that his actions were atrocious, but necessary. that's within the last few minutes. his lawyer saying that he believed his actions were atrocious but necessary. and how atrocious were there? 85 people, most of them kids killed o
the greater transparency and the stronger governance we need in britain's policing. let me turn to the specific questions i have been asked in recent days. first, it has been suggested that my chief of staff was behaving wrongly when he didn't take up the commissioneruate's offer to be briefed on police investigations. i have said repeatedly about the police investigation they should pursue the evidence where ever it leads and arrest exactly who they wish. that is exactly what they have done. number ten is the exchange between my chief of staff and john yates. the reply to the police made clear it would not be appropriate to give me or my staff any privileged briefing. the reply that he sent -- the reply that he sent was cleared in advance by my permanent secretary jeremy hayward. just imagine mr. speaker if they had done the opposite. if they had asked for receiving privileged information, even if there is no intention to use it. there would have been justified outrage. to risk any perception that number ten was seeking to influence a police investigation in any way would have
. currently britain the biggest sunday publication. the end of that is no loss to humanity. >>> stateside, tim plenty goes gaga. with bloggers in iowa i. have a question for you guys. are you ready? >> we're ready. >> what's your favorite lady gaga song? >> that's easy. >> "glory ". >> "glory." >> "paparazzi ". >> in terms of the beat, i like "bad romance ". i got to say, even though she's a little unusual, "born this way" -- she's actually talented. go to the end of the lady gaga hbo special and watch her sing a cappella, "born this way" she can definitely sing. she's talented. if you had to limit your choices to just conservatives we wouldn't have a lot of choices. >> wow. republican politician. any politician that knows the phrase a cappella impresses me. i call him good & plenty. a stafferal idea for a politician to say which he often sounds like. >>> now to the big numbers. president obama, a man of his words. the questions at yesterday's town hall limited to 140 characters each, how many did the president use per each, per answer to respond jp 2,099 words on average. characters that is o
were yet available. more on the phone hacking in britain, david cameron is cutting short an african trip and ordering a special parliamentary session, extending the session on the start of a scheduled summer recess for emergency meeting on wednesday. this following the resignation of britain's top police officer and the rest of rebekah brooks, the former ceo of rupert murdoch's news international. mr. murdoch, his son james and ms. brooks are set to testify before a parliamentary inquiry tomorrow. you can hear it live at 9:30 a.m. eastern here on c-span radio. those are some of the latest headlines. >> had ever visited the library of congress? over 2 million people have and now this is your chance to tour the world's largest library. tonight, join c-span for a rare glimpse inside the library of congress. we will take you into the great hall and explore the main reading room. unique books and rare books and special collections including original books from thomas jefferson's personal collection. but we will see how the library is using modern technology to discover hidden secrets and
credibility issues with the maid but have not dropped the case. >>> this sunday, britain's most read tabloid is printing its final edition. rupert murdoch's "news of the world" is shutting down amid claims it hacked into the voice mails of various people including celebrities, politicians, and terror victims. >>> and san francisco police have arrested a suspect who was caught on surveillance video moments after they say he stole a pablo picasso sketch from an art galley. they say the new jersey man walked into the gallery, just took the sketch off the wall and walked out. and how much is it worth? anderson, the picasso piece is valued at around $200,000. >> wow. that's amazing, just walked in and took it. >>> coming up, did they get any closer to a deficit reduction plan? >>> also, willie nelson's pot case takes an unexpected turn landing the judge on the ridiculous. another good thing about geico is, they've got, like, real live people working there 24/7. so like say you need to report a claim, alright. a real person will be there to help you. then you can use geico.com to view photos of th
with the maid but have not dropped the case. this sunday britain's most-read tabloid is printing its final edition. rupert murdoch's "news of the world" is shutting down amid claims it hacked into the voice mails of of of various people including celebrities, politicians and terror victims. and san francisco police have arrested a suspect who was caught on surveillance video moments after they say he stole a pablo picasso sketch from an art gallery. they say the new jersey man walked into the gallery, just took the sketch off the wall and walked out. and how much is it worth? anderson? the picasso piece is valued at around $200,000. >> wow. that's amazing. just walked in and took it. crazy. still ahead, raw politics. did today's white house meeting move democrats and republicans any closer to a deficit reductions deal or are they bluffing about the lines in the stand they've drawn? we'll have the latest ahead. also willie nelson's texas pot case takes an unexpected turn, landing the judge on ridiculist. [ male announcer ] introducing the ultimate business phone -- t the motorola expert fro
of the investigations that are now ongoing. this has been an extraordinary story in great britain with implications for a worldwide media empire. >> 168 years coming to an end. breaking news with mike taibbi. thank you so much. >>> mixed reviews for president obama's first-ever twitter town hall. during yesterday's hour-long event, the president took about 17 questions from users all over the country. most were about jobs and the budget, including this one from house speaker john boehner. boehner asking quote, after embarking on a record spending binge that's left us deeper in debt, where are the jobs? >> obviously, john's the speaker of the house. he's a republican and so this is a slightly skewed question. but what he's right about is that we have not seen fast enough job growth relative to the need. we haven't gotten the kind of cooperation that i'd like to see on some of those ideas and initiatives but i'm just going to keep on trying and eventually, i'm sure the speaker will see the light. >> kim is business editor of the times-picayune in new orleans. she was part of the team that picked the
have revealed credibility issues with the maid but have not dropped the case. >>> this sunday, britain's most-read tabloid is printing its final edition. rupert murdoch's "news of the world" is shutting down amid claims it hacked into the voice mails of various people including celebrities, politicians, and terror victims. >>> and san francisco police have arrested a suspect who was caught on surveillance video moments after they say he stole a pablo py picacsso stech from an art gallery. they say he walked into the gallery, took the sketch off the wall. the piece is valued at around $200,000. >> that's amazing just walked in and took it. >>> this is a cautionary tale. story lines pretty simple, a bride, a groom and a zip line. newlyweds wanted to make a memorable entrance at their wedding reception. you can see where this was going. it was very memorable all right. take a look. >> starts off okay with the bride out in front. the dress is the only problem at first. then the groom picks up speed. and ouch. looks -- yeah. looks like someone did not pay attention to physics class, mass an
are reportedly expanding their investigation into conduct here. the other in great britain. rupert murdoch's son is being challenged for claims he made to members of parliament. let's start there with atika shubert in london. james murdoch said, as far as he knew, the phone hacking was a single rogue reporter. but two former executives are denying that. >> reporter: that's right. this all hinges on one particular e-mail. basically, "news veof the world said this was only limited to one private investigator and one reporter but an e-mail named another reporter. this showed that it was more than just an isolated case. now, at that time, james murdoch had also authorized a payment to a phone-hacking victim for a massive amount. it was a million dollars which is very unusual. what he said in parliament he had authorized this payment thinking it was the only isolated case. now, what the former lawyer for "news of the world" and the former editor are saying that's not true. in fact, they showed him that e-mail before he authorized that payment and it's important because it may show an attempt to try a
. if they believe that that isn't the case, then again the aaa goes. one of the reasons, wolf, britain has embarked on this draconian austerity, they believed the market was going to blow up uk bonds. it was warned it was on a negative. the u.s. has been warned it's on a negative watch. and it hasn't managed to put together this deal yet to actually avoid default. so you've got to ask yourself, maybe the rating agencies are doing their job in actually warning that something is smelly under the hood. >> richard, how does the rest of the world see what's happening in the united states right now. you're in london. >> which word would you like many eto use? flabber gasterred, bewildered, horrified, alarmed, concerned? any one of them will do. what people are saying at the very top level, and they will not say it publicly yet, but if you talk to policymakers, they will say what the heck are they playing at over there in the u.s.? don't they realize they're playing with fire. wolf, remember back many lehman brother, what was so damaging was not just lehman brothers, it was the uncertainty, the dislocatio
opposed to obamacare because i lived under national health in britain for three years and i know what happens. eu end up with a ration care. this last saturday on my program i had a nurse practitioner call in from arkansas who said that already they are being turned down for treatments. they request treatment and are being turned down under medicare because the person is terminal. since they are terminal, the treatment is not worth giving. they suffer and die. there is a woman going blind and that she cannot get treatment for her element that is causing her to go blind, because she is terminal. dr. berwick, put in a recess appointment ito be the head of medicare, is it in a love affair with the british system. they deny people 59.5 because it is not a good investment. even president obama said it was perhaps not the best use of resources to give his grandmother and a hip replacement after she was diagnosed with terminal ccer. i guess she could hobble around in panama she was dying of cancer. that is a -- not the kindh -- whilee around in pain b she was dying of cancer. that is not the
's a fascinating story. the murdochs basically drew a line in the sand at the hearings in britain a couple days ago. there's a lot of terrible things going on, a lot of people are culpable, but we didn't know about it. they did a good job i thought. the problem with the story, it's got to stand up. if it stands up, they escape. if it doesn't, they're in big trouble. some of the executives blamed, are saying, hey, we told james murdoch, james murdoch didn't understand why they paid people off, he was new at the job, he agreed to go along with it. the legal manager and the former editor of the "news of the world," two very senior executives at news international have issued aut!ñ statement say that's not true, we actually briefed him in detail on, he knew exactly what was happening. it's not clear if that's the sort of start or trend and people are concerned and say the murdochs got it all wrong and they were lying basically to parliament, then they're in big trouble. >> with all you know and your experience, you working in the community, do the murdoch statements align with what you've heard about
the top of the hour. a couple headlines. new twist in the scandal surrounding newspapers in britain owned by news international today. former prime minister gordon brown accused the sunday times of hiring criminals to obtain confidential information about his private life by hacking into his bank account. news international is owned by news corp., the parent company of fox news. >>> and new video of riots in ireland that injured 22 police officers, catholics and protestants took to the streets with petro bombs and bricks. protestants were celebrating the battle victory over catholics. >>> brian, back to you. >> brian: talks resume today, congress about to go into a meeting in about ten minutes. but before she goes to that meeting, to her caucus, kathy mcmorris rogers, vice chairmanwoman of the house republican conference joins us now. congresswoman, in your estimation, the republicans have won the first -- for the first time in years, won the women's vote this time. why did they? >> the reason that the republicans won the women's vote is because women all across this country saw where pre
through the mud. we're a morally diverse group. people think we're out of control here. in britain they're really out of control. as we heard from -- my god -- hugh grant a moment ago, it's not just journalists. "the guardian" newspaper had something to say as well. a real phone-hacking inquiry must defeat ministers' tricks. government inquiry ahead but also the fact there may be political interference. if an inquiry is properly conducted then at the very least it will drag out a lot of hidden truths, make a lot of otherwise unaccountable people accountable and give the news media, the police and the government a lot of things to think about. so, this isn't just a few rogue reporters. this is basically the role particular slice of british reporters have -- >> now it's gone to parliament, debating what to do about this. it will be interesting to see if a new set of guidelines, ethics is implemented because it's reached a point pretty detrimental. >> the parliament doesn't know what to do because murdoch is so powerful. david cameron, his own communications director used to be the editor
of buzz in the papers. and it involves another relationship with the mom of a slain girl in britain? >> yeah, it does. this stuff continues to drip out. sarah pane was the mother of a murdered british girl and it turns out now that her phone was targeted by a private investigator who was working for the news of the world which as you know has been closed down with this whole crisis that has happened over the phone hacking scandal. sarah became a pretty prominent activist after her daughter was murdered. she's saying she can't believe that this has happened and in the very last edition of news of the world, she actually even wrote a column for them and said amid all the criticism, news of the world has been a force for good. the police have confirmed that she was a target of phone hacking. she also had a very close relationship with rebekah brooks, former editor of "news of the world" and former executive of news enter natiint. the yardi guardian newspaper reads fresh test for friendship. it says one woman was an ambitious young tabloid editor, the other a grieving mother who had jus
. in this country and in great britain as well, we have what's called the litigation privilege. a fancy phrase meaning whatever you say in a courtroom or whatever you say in furtherance of what goes on in the courtroom, could be in a judge's chambers. could be in a conference room is absolutely privileged meaning it cannot form the basis for litigation. if that were not so, then these trials would never end and people would always sue others for what they said during the course of the trial. also if that were not so, it might inhibit people from answering truthfully a question put to them in the courtroom. now, this is a little bit unusual because it came from the mouth of the lawyer. whatever lawyers say in the courtroom cannot form the basis of a lawsuit. where did he get this from? did he make this up or did she tell him to say this? if he made it up, he committed an ethics violation but that's between him and the ethics prosecutors in florida. if she gave him information on which to base this outrageous claim, then he's not only permitted to do it but he exercised his judgment and decided
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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